Deaf dumb
I'm an aesthetically overly sensitive medicated university educated depressed pansexual creative border-line alcoholic mildly autistic introvert trying to escape a working class Irish catholic upbringing whilst maintaining the farce that I'm a normal run-of-the-mill employed professional that isn't being slowly murdered by a thousand boring conversations. They kept telling me to talk to god and I kept wondering when he was supposed to answer back. It didn't take me long to figure out they were all mad. So I got out, but, it turns out everyone else was mad as well.
Deaf dumb
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robotcosmonaut:

Squirt Gun #4
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vinylespassion:

Garden Shed, by Avanto Architects Ltd, Linda Bergroth, Finland.

Blogged before, blogging again, somebody take me here so I can have a nap and listen to records.
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p356:

Porsche 356
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musicbabes:

Kaki King, 2008.
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infinite-paradox:

coquettesfancy: eyetwist_signs_507 by eyetwist on Flickr.
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By Sarah Gomez http://yellowmenace8.blogspot.com.au/2014/07/artist-sarah-gonzales-all-about-noodles.html
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mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
mastersoflight:

Southern Gothic Noir Pt. II: Night of The Hunter (Charles Laughton, 1955)
Visually one of my favorite movies of all-time, this dark fairytale is set in the swamps of the American South and borrows the language of film noir. It’s a delicious combination, and the film has been highly influential for many prominent filmmakers.
Robert Mitchum (wonderfully creepy as always) plays an unscrupulous con-artist and self-appointed preacher, who memorably uses the tattoos of “good” and “evil” on his knuckles to narrate a parable about human nature. Shelly Winters appears as the (as usual) hapless wife who ends up collateral damage in Mitchum’s scheme to find the money hidden by her now-deceased convict husband, the location of which is only known by her children. In a truly brilliant casting decision, American’s Sweetheart, Lillian Gish, is the children’s savior - a tough old hymn-singing woman with a shotgun.
The whole film is told from the children’s point of view as an eerie fairytale with frogs, rabbits and spider webs appearing in the foreground and stark expressionist sets filled with shadows.
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mothhearts:

constantpains:

cyranohs:

gang girl!

mothhearts

constantpains 😘💕💕💕
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1950sunlimited:

Coffee Vending Machine 1960s